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Thread: Has anyone taken the online ATEC test?

  1. #1
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    We've taken it before, as a matter of fact multiple times. I typically fill it out for my ds every six months to gauge how effectively biomedical treatments are working for us, and have had his therapists fill it out also to get a different point of view. I know that if your child scores below thirty, then it is likely they will grow up to live a fairly normal life- jobs, marriage, independent functioning, etc. Ten or below is considered recovered

  2. #2
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    BTW- I don't think 87 is THAT high...more in the moderate range. I know someone whose child scored well over a hundred on it.

  3. #3
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    I just took it again for ds. He got an eleven. That's the exact same score he had three or four months ago. I believe we were in the 70-80's somewhere the first time we took it- I would have to check my email and see (I save them all in a file). He has made tremendous progress and for the last year has been waffling back and forth from 7-8 to 11. Doesn't matter.... I'll take it either way. lol

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuchan
    My son scores 49. Since it is higher than 30 does it mean he cannot have a meaningful life? I tried to be as conservative as possible when answering but I am sure a totally neutral score might be little higher.

    No, not at all. With therapy and interventions your sons score will improve! And those numbers Igave are just guidelines anyway. The first time I took it for my son he was almost four and scored higher than your son. He has made so much progress in such a short period of time and is only just turned 6. I know he will continue to improve even more as he gets older. With hard work and a lot of love, your son will too [img]smileys/smiley1.gif[/img]

  5. #5
    I had never done this one for me son before. I just did it for my youngest and he got a 64. What exactly does that mean?

  6. #6
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    This was interesting - never heard of this before! I'm gong to start taking
    this every 6 months. My son scored a 113.



  7. #7
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    <H2>http://www.autism.com/ind_atec_report.asp</H2>
    <H2></H2>
    <H2>December 2005 Update</H2>


    The Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC) was developed in 1999 to help researchers evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments for autistic children and adults and to help parents determine if their children benefit from a specific treatment. Parents and teachers use the ATEC to monitor or track how well their children are progressing over time, even without the introduction of a new treatment.
    <H2>Reliability</H2>


    We examined the internal consistency of the ATEC by conducting a split-half reliability test on over 1,300 completed ATECs. The internal consistency reliability was high (.94 for the Total score). Professor Jim Adams at Arizona State University is conducting a study on the ATEC’s test-retest reliability. An initial analysis of the data, based on 22 parents, is very encouraging. Dr. Adams continues to collect data for his study.
    <H2>Validity</H2>


    We are aware of three published studies which has shown the ATEC to be sensitive to changes as a result of a treatment:
    <UL>
    <LI>Betty Jarusiewicz (2002). Efficacy of neurofeedback for children in the autism spectrum: A pilot study. Journal of Neurotherapy, 2002, Vol. 6 (4), pp. 39-49
    </LI>
    <LI>Derrick Lonsdale, Raymond J. Shamberger, Tapan Audhya (2002). Treatment of autism spectrum children with thiamine tetrahydrofurfuryl disulfide: A pilot study. Neuroendocrinology Letters, Vol. 23 (4), pp. 303-308
    </LI>
    <LI>A study published on the Internet, by Jørgen Klaveness and Jay Bigam, showed that the ATEC was able to measure behavioral improvements as a result of the gluten-free/casein-free diet (www.gfcfdiet.com/dietsurveysept2.htm).</LI>[/list]


    Dr. Doreen Granpeesheh of the Center for Autism Related Disorders (CARD) is currently conducing a study examining the validity of the ATEC (i.e., comparing the results from the ATEC with the results from various standardized tests). We are also aware of several other studies that have successfully used the ATEC to evaluate various treatments. These studies are currently in preparation for publication.
    <TABLE align=center>
    <T>
    <TR>
    <TD>Bernard Rimland, Ph.D.</TD>
    <TD>Stephen M. Edelson, Ph.D.</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD>Director</TD>
    <TD>Research Associate</TD></TR></T></TABLE>
    <H2>Statistical Analyses: May 7, 2000</H2>
    <H3>Reliabilities and Score Distributions</H3>


    The following data are based on the first 1358 initial (baseline) ATEC forms submitted to the Autism Research Institute. “Initial” refers to the first ATEC form submitted for a given individual.


    Since the primary function of the ATEC is to measure the efficacy of interventions, it is expected that a number of ATECs will be submitted for each individual periodically during the trial of the intervention, subsequent to the initial (baseline) ATEC.
    <H4>Reliability</H4>


    Pearson split-half (internal consistency) coefficient
    N=1358
    <TABLE align=center>
    <T>
    <TR>
    <TD></TD>
    <TD>Uncorrected r</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD>Scale I Speech
    Scale II: Sociability
    Scale III: Sensory/Cognitive Awareness
    Scale IV: Health/Physical/Behavior
    Total ATEC Score</TD>
    <TD>.920
    .836
    .875
    .815
    .942</TD></TR></T></TABLE>


    These are gratifyingly high reliabilities. So far, so good!



    <H4>Score Distributions</H4>


    The purpose of the ATEC is to measure change in an individual due to various interventions - that is - the difference between the initial (baseline) ATEC scores and later ATEC scores. Nevertheless, we are often asked for normative data, which permit comparison of one individual with others. Here are the score distributions. (The lower the scores, the better.)



    <TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=30 width=50 align=center>
    <T>
    <TR>
    <TD></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>Scale I
    Speech

    Range: 0-28</CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>Scale II
    Sociability

    Range: 0-40
    <CENTER></CENTER></CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>Scale III
    Sensory/Cognitive Awareness
    Range: 0-36</CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>Scale IV
    Health/Physical/
    Behavior

    Range: 0-75</CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>


    Total
    Range: 0-180</CENTER></TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>Centile
    Mild
    0-9
    10-19
    20-29
    30-39
    40-49
    50-59
    60-69
    70-79
    80-89
    90-99
    Severe</CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>
    0-2
    3-5
    6-7
    8-10
    11-12
    13-15
    16-19
    20-21
    22-24
    25-28</CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>
    0-4
    5-7
    8-10
    11
    12-13
    14-15
    16-18
    19-21
    22-25
    26-40</CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>
    0-5
    6-8
    9-11
    12-13
    14-15
    16-17
    18-19
    20-21
    22-25
    26-36</CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>
    0-8
    9-12
    13-15
    16-18
    19-21
    22-24
    25-28
    29-32
    33-39
    40-75</CENTER></TD>
    <TD>
    <CENTER>
    0-30
    31-41
    42-50
    51-57
    58-64
    65-71
    72-79
    80-89
    90-103
    104-179</CENTER></TD></TR></T></TABLE>

  8. #8
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    http://www.autism-nutrition.com/atec.html


    ATEC scores range from zero to 180. The lower the score, the better.


    If a child scores zero or close to zero, that child cannot be distinguished from other normal children. He or she can be considered fully recovered and not autistic.
    <DIV align=center ="copy13">


    </DIV>
    The important benchmarks in scoring are as follows:
    <DIV ="copy13">
    <UL>
    <LI>ATEC &lt; 30. This level places the child in the top 10 percentile. A child with score of less than 30 – or, better still, less than 20 – would have some ability to conduct normal, two-way conversations, and more or less behave normally. Such children have high chances of leading normal lives as independent individuals.



    <LI>ATEC &lt; 50. This places the child in the 30th percentile level. The child has good chances of being semi-independent. More importantly, he or she will not likely need to be placed in an institution. For many parents of autistic children, being able to achieve improvement up to this level is already considered very significant.


    <LI>ATEC &gt; 104. Even though the maximum score is 180, any person with a score of more than 104 would already be in the 90th percentile, and be considered very severely autistic. </LI>[/list]</DIV>
    The range of scores, and their percentile levels, are shown in the table below:
    <DIV ="copy13">
    <DIV ="copy13"></DIV>
    <DIV align=center ="copy13">
    <TABLE border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=7><T>
    <T>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">Percentile</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">ATEC score</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">mild autism
    0 - 9</TD>
    <TD vAlign=bottom width=140 align=middle ="copy12">0 - 30</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">10 - 19</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">31 - 41</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">20 - 29</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">42 - 50</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">30 - 39</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">51 - 57</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">40 - 49</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">58 - 64</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">50 - 59</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">65 - 71</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">60 - 69</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">72 - 79</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">70 - 79</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">80 - 89</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">80 - 89</TD>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">90 - 103</TD></TR>
    <TR>
    <TD width=140 align=middle ="copy12">90 - 100
    severe autism</TD>
    <TD vAlign=top width=140 align=middle ="copy12">104 - 180</TD></TR></T></T></TABLE></DIV>

    As the table shows, the scores are not evenly spread. Thus, the number of improvement points is not as vital as what the final score is.
    For example, a moderately autistic child who improves by 40 points, from 45 to 5, would be far better off than a severely autistic child who improves by, say, 100 points from 180 to 80.

    *Edited because I did not read this fully before I pasted it on to the page and found some phrases used offensive. Also took out the part about improvements from biomedical treatments as other interventions were not discussed* If you would like to read the full page follow the link </DIV>Edited by: JulieA

  9. #9
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    So for a child to be considered 'recovered' or not autistic, they would have to score 10 or below, and a zero score would mean they are indistinguishable????


    I had thought that Jacob would score pretty close to typical, but he got a 39. I thought, geez, but he's come so far! Then I took it as if it were when he was 2 1/2 years old, and he got a 93. So I'm not crazy - he has come really far!!!!

    Just out of curiosity, I took it for my other son, who is not on the spectrum, but does have speech articulation issues -- he scored a 9 (which I guess was mainly due to the speech issues and some behavioral quirks).

    It's interesting to be able to do comparisons over time like that!

    Edited by: jsmith567

  10. #10
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    My girl scored a 36 and the highest numbers were in sensory and behaviors. That makes sense since she is currently fighting bacteria, which always makes her behaviors worse.


    I am excited. I can't remember her original score but it was pretty high.

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